Captain: Lynne Fraker

Home Port: Lake Tashmoo

The Name: Ena.“She’s named after my grandmother.”

The Boat: Thirty-four-foot Malabar Senior made of mahogany over oak, built by theAlden Design Office in 1957.

Ivy Ashe

Leo Cooper of Stamford, Connecticut, invented the Goo-Goo Eyes plug in the late 1950s to bewitch big striped bass. It worked. On the night of June 16, 1967, Charlie Cinto caught the Massachusetts state record seventy-three-pound striped bass while trolling a blue and white Goo-Goo Eyes Big Daddy at Cuttyhunk with Captain Frank Sabatowski. Charlie recently told me that the way they fished was to back down to a rip, keep the boat in position, and let the plug go back into the strike zone on wire line. “Then hold on! I remember every nerve in my body would be ready.

Kib Bramhall

Since ancient times, maritime signal flags have been hoisted to transmit information between ships at sea.

The Vineyard isn’t alone when it comes to dealing with issues of erosion, sea level rise, and the perils of living so close to the ocean.

Peter Brannen

Sailors, pilots, and farmers don’t like when temperature fluctuations between air and water, or air and land, bring fog into their daily lives. Artists, on the other hand, appreciate its otherworldliness.

Peter Brannen

On Tuesday, after reeling in my first fish ever, I lifted up the big bluefish and turned around to see my friends Tom and Mike with their iPhone cameras perched over wide smiles. They were as exhilarated as I was. Perhaps this is what happens when you combine two guys who have a bunch of Derby pins and plaques with their pitiful friend who’s fished the Derby the last three years without a single catch.

Nicki Miller

On a breezy July day, a fleet of a hundred sailboats of many shapes and sizes gathers in Vineyard Haven, united by a love of sailing and racing. The harbor bustles with its usual mid-summer activity, and the diverse fleet dodges the Island Home and other vessels on their way to and fro. Out on the course, the skies are hazy as boats round a bell buoy serving as a mark, some with barking of orders and frantic cranking of winches, while others have sailors with glasses of wine in hand.

Jim Miller

Whether you live on-Island year-round or seasonally or simply think the Vineyard is a great place to visit, it’s easy to get stuck in a routine. That may mean you don’t really know all that much about what’s more than a mile from your bed or beach. You may not realize, for instance, that you can rent a small sailboat for the week your family comes to visit, or a Boston Whaler for some time during the Derby.

Carolyn O'Daly

Pages