Every September and October, thousands of fishermen descend on the Island to participate in the annual Martha’s Vineyard Striped Bass and Bluefish Derby. You pay your fee and are handed a baseball cap and a badge with a registration number. Many of us who fish the Derby have hats that are strewn with badges from prior years, with anything more than a handful representing a respectable commitment to the event – a badge in and of itself.

Kathleen F. Wright

The history of first families on Martha’s Vineyard.

It’s sunny, it’s dry, it’s summer, and anyone who is not on a beach, in a boat, or regrettably, at work this afternoon is here at the harborfront. The quiet, gray harbor of the winter past is ancient history. No snow beanies sit atop the pier posts. No ice chunks corral the ducks into scant pools of bathwater. We’re sporting our skimpy clothes and celebrity shades. We’re cramming the open-air drinking holes and eateries, sucking in salt air, shellfish, and beer.

Shelley Christiansen

One hundred and forty-five years ago, the toughest crewman aboard the Holmes Hole whaling ship America attacked the mate with a knife. But this confrontation led to an even more shocking incident, as the crewman revealed that he was a she.

Tom Dunlop

Just thirty years ago, the Vineyard and neighboring islands voted to secede from the Commonwealth of Massachusetts.

Mike Seccombe

Since Hurricane Katrina, people seem to be taking hurricane warnings more seriously. But there was a time when they didn’t. And there was a time when we didn’t even get warnings of impending hurricanes.

In 1954, we were a young family living in West Tisbury in what was then the parsonage of the Congregational Church. It was across the road from Johnson Whiting’s house, which still showed evidence of the 1938 hurricane: three elm trees, toppled by the high winds, were lying crisscrossed in the front yard.

Shirley Mayhew

The Revolutionary War was not one of Martha’s Vineyard’s shining moments.

Unable to persuade authorities in Boston that it held any strategic value, the Island felt exposed and undefended from the start of the war to its finish and was reluctant to take sides, lest it wind up fighting for the losers. But neutrality did not protect it from invasion.

Max Hart

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