After more than three decades designing and taking care of Vineyard gardens large and small, Peggy Schwier has learned that the best horticulture teacher of all is the garden itself.

Peggy Schwier

You stare at that dry, sandy patch of finicky Island soil in front of your home and envision a low flowering shrub that is drought tolerant and can thrive in partial sunlight. Wouldn’t hurt if the plant were a Vineyard native, too. But you wonder, is that combination possible to find?

Nicole Grace Mercier

The Sheriff’s Meadow Foundation is now in its second season of using goats to clear invasive Asiatic bittersweet vines from Cedar Tree Neck. That decision was mostly a logistical one. “We were just brainstorming different ways to manage the neck because it’s really hard to access with machinery to mow,” said Kristen Fauteux, director of stewardship for Sheriff’s Meadow.

Ivy Ashe

The only sounds were the rustling of branches and the crunching of leaves. It was a brilliant late-summer morning, and a herd of goats was having breakfast on a piece of land near Black Point Pond, where Rebecca Brown of Island Grazing was working on a private meadow restoration project. There were tall Kiko and Boer goats stretching up on their legs to grab leaves, and smaller Arapawa goats staying closer to the ground. The goats – fifty-five of them – moved down the road, eating as they went.

Ivy Ashe

Something there may be that doesn’t love a wall, according to Robert Frost, but who can resist a white picket fence?

No one in Edgartown, it would seem.

Alexandra Bullen Coutts

Perched above Lambert’s Cove Road in West Tisbury, with views across the wetlands to Vineyard Sound and the Elizabeth Islands, The Folly is Friederike and Jeremy Biggs’s unexpected paean to classical Italian living. Their two-story stucco villa and surrounding seventeen acres reflect the couple’s passion for travel, art, romance, whimsy, comfort, and natural beauty. And while post-and-beam architecture and weathered shingles may be more the norm on Martha’s Vineyard, the Biggses have somehow managed to make their Folly appear right at home.

Karla Araujo

Protective measures help plants survive the crueler months.

Nicole Grace Mercier

A gardener’s tale of creating an old-fashioned romantic garden for actors Mary Steenburgen and Ted Danson.

Peggy Schwier

Pages

How it Works: Keep Deer Out of Your Garden

When you walk out to our backyard, the first thing you’ll notice is that CDs are hanging from the branches of many of our bushes. It’s not because we want our forsythias to look like gypsies; it’s to scare away the damn deer.

Varmints That Can Ruin Your Day

My strategy is to plant a little more than I need of everything, do my imperfect best at pest control, then resign myself to sharing some of my bounty with the critters and insects.

Carlos Montoya's Favorite Native Plants

A renowned expert on indigenous flora on Martha’s Vineyard, Carlos Montoya has been interested in native plants since he began landscaping here some twenty years ago.

Daffodils: The End of Waiting

Daffodils are the year-round Vineyarder’s special pleasure, along with pinkletinks and parking spots in Edgartown.

A Garden (Barely) Grows in Katama

A gardener finds that the land at Katama giveth, but mostly it taketh away.

In the Gardens of Edgartown

A rose is not just a rose, and other surprises.

Growing Outside In

From inside my greenhouse I see the world outside: the chickadees flying back and forth, the clouds ambling past, a crow flapping its way above the treetops. The quiet is reflected in the stillness of the brown grass and gray, hibernating trees beyond the fence that surrounds my dormant summer garden. But inside, in a garden bed raised to knee level, there is a tiny field of vibrant green kale, Swiss chard, and New Zealand spinach. Red geraniums, orange and yellow nasturtiums, and the pungent purple spikes of rosemary grow in pots nearby.

Growing Outside In

Margaret Knight gets downright tropical in her Chappy greenhouse.

You Can Go Home Again

Denys Wortman finds you really can go home again.

Vegetable Love

We tried to keep our expectations low, but secretly we believed in our soil, our seeds, and our own high hopes.

Pages